Most of what gets shared as heartwarming stories are usually temporary, small-scale responses to systemic failures. I wish we found it just as inspirational to make structural changes to unjust systems, but I don’t know if our culture knows how to tell those stories.

2:00 PM · Mar 6, 2019

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Replying to @anildash
Need to dress some adorable children up as lobbyists and have them feed a bill into the system I guess
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Let’s put on a show and completely eliminate the need for orphanages, rather than save the orphanage!
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Replying to @anildash
And this is something to mull over.
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True, but we *do* make progress. We just don’t know how to tell the story.
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Replying to @anildash
We actively know how to silence those stories and twist them. Economic anxiety as a cover for white fragility, men's rights activists, etc. We sell stories of fear even when they are born from changes based in overwhelming hope.
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Replying to @anildash
Then it’s our job to tell them.
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Replying to @anildash
Joe Stalin's right, "One death is a tragedy a thousand deaths is a statistic". The challenge: Make narratives from trends or systemic failings. My bias: art / popular culture can both spotlight injustice and model a better world. "Will and Grace" moved the culture on gay rights
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